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Measuring Florida Occupational Therapists’ Interest and Feasibility in Providing Therapy Services to Majority World Nations

Measuring Florida Occupational Therapists’ Interest and Feasibility in Providing Therapy Services to Majority World Nations

“The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems” -Mahatma Ghandi

By: Rachel Cromwell and Sharon Hope Winters Students at Advent Health University
Correspond to: Sharon Winters, [email protected]

 

The world has become a global society with the ability to achieve an interconnected community. The problem is the world has a global view without global support. Resources are available yet avenues to bring resources abroad in a safe, effective way are scarce. Third world nations, also known as majority world nations or developing world nations, have deficits in care, education, and equipment. Occupational rights are such an integral part of American and European society that the Office of Public Sector Information and the United States Department of Justice have put laws in place for people with disabilities guaranteeing equal access to education, employment, and public buildings and activities. Developed nations have funding that support large amounts of rehabilitation research, development of technology that support mobility, cognition, and sensory while health as a right is very difficult for marginalized populations. Inequitable distribution of health opportunities globally is a major factor in health deficits. It is a joint responsibility of both domestic and external governments to fulfill health rights of majority world citizens (Barugahare & Lie, 2016; Reynolds, 2010). There is a lack of awareness of this need, lack of therapists available to provide services, and lack of safe, economical methods to bring relief to these countries.

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Texting: The impact on departmental events to increase student retention

Texting: The impact on departmental events to increase student retention

Kurt K. Hubbard, PhD, OTD, OTR/L
FAOTA Education SIS Chair

Occupational Therapy education is not unlike other programs of study when it comes to the trials and tribulations of student engagement. College educators and administers are constantly trying to find new ways to improve students’ academic performance and retention. Literature demonstrates that brief psychological interventions in education may have a significant positive impact on performance and retention (Yeager & Walton, 2011). Specifically, brief socialpsychological interventions that focus on the way students think, feel, and believe regarding academics, have been shown to improve educational achievement (Cohen, Garcia, Apfel, & Master, 2006; Walton & Cohen, 2011). At multiple sites and disciplines (e.g., psychology undergraduate students, OTA students), the hypothesis that personalized text messages about departmental activities and resources could increase student retention was tested.

Methods: At orientation, 48 students completed a series of questionnaires, provided their cell phone numbers, and agreed to receive text messages about program events, campus resources, college announcements, as well as selective course announcements. Students were randomly assigned into text message conditions, providing a sample of 20 students in the experimental and control conditions. Both conditions received one text every week, but the experimental group texts included the student name to personalize the information in order to make the student feel identified and like they belonged to the department and the college environment (see Table 1 for an example). The messages were sent from a temporary Skype account to provide information and encourage feelings of belongingness and connectedness to the major and college. Following the 12-week semester, participants were asked to complete an online survey, identical to the ones they completed at orientation. In addition, participants were asked about their intentions to continue their program of study and overall enrollment at the college. Participant schedules were reviewed following the 12-week semester to investigate if they returned to their studies.

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FOTA... Who We Are

FOTA...

Who We Are

The Florida Occupational Therapy Association (FOTA) is an all volunteer organization with the exception of one paid employee. That one employee, which many of you who have contacted the organization already know, is named Janine. She is fantastic at what she does for the organization, handling many of the day to day tasks that administratively need to be addressed. FOTA proudly represents the interest of over 16,000+ occupational therapy practitioners (occupational therapists, occupational therapy assistants, and students). Currently, membership in our organization is approximately 1,000 total members, with half of those members being students (our future practitioners). Of the 500 approximate practitioners, we have 50 or so practitioners who are tasked with running the organization and the scope of its reach. So, you might ask, why all the honesty? Because FOTA believes in transparency and we feel it is important you know who we are and what we do. We also need to be honest in expressing how necessary you are to that definition, as we are all simultaneously co-evolving.

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Trauma and Trauma Informed (TI) Approaches to Care:Applications to Occupational Therapy Practice

Trauma and Trauma Informed (TI) Approaches to Care:Applications to Occupational Therapy Practice

by Mirtha Montejo Whaley, PhD, MPH, OTR/L

Trauma is widespread and has profound effects that can lead to emotional and physical distress throughout the lifespan. Statistics from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on abuse and violence in the United States indicate the following:

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The Metamorphosis of Identity through the Chrysalis of Fieldwork Education

I was recently inspired by Stephen Covey’s internationally acclaimed book, 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (Covey, 2004). In it he states, “Self-growth is tender; it’s holy ground and there’s no greater investment” (Covey, 2004, p. 70). This reminded me of the term reflective practitioner (Adam, Peters, & Chipchase, 2013; Bannigan, & Moores, 2009; Knightbridge, 2019; O’Reilly, & Milner, 2015; Parham, 1984), and the process of self-discovery that educators hope will occur during their OT and OTA students’ level II fieldwork journeys. Self-awareness, self-discovery, and the process of self-reflection are key tenants in identity creation, which in this context, is a level II fieldwork student’s ability to establish a clinical identity as an entry-level prepared practitioner. Quality fieldwork educators are key in this identity transformation from student to occupational therapy practitioner. The maturation process that culminates in successfully passing fieldwork, thus allowing graduation, is only the beginning of the self-growth journey that has just begun for these new practitioners. As fieldwork educators, awareness of our own self-growth equips us to mentor these future colleagues and model compassionate and effective service delivery. Our ability to reflect on our clinical competencies and the identity transformations that continually occur throughout our careers and lived experiences empower our distinct value as occupational therapists. It elevates and inspires human potential within us, our clients, our colleagues, and our students. Allow me to reflect on a recent self-growth journey of my own.

This year I chose to say yes to a professional opportunity that required significant self-awareness, self-reflection, and proactivity towards my career as an occupational therapy practitioner; a valued role that I take great pride in, and one that significantly contributes to my self-efficacy and sense of purpose. I said yes to academia after more than 17 years in adult inpatient rehabilitation – an area of clinical practice that will forever remain my first love. This one “big” decision, of saying yes to a new job as an Academic Fieldwork Coordinator (AFWC), was much more than a singular decision made in a one-dimensional context. It required countless smaller, yet just as “big” decisions, whose consequences affected multiple individuals, systems, processes, and relationships across a myriad of environments, both personal and professional. My decision could not be made without an awareness of the occupational disruptions that my self-perceived “big” decision would surely cause in my colleagues’ lived work experiences, as well as in their perceptions of me as their boss. It was a decision that required months of continual assessment, reassessment, reflection, and consideration of my valued roles, habits, routines, goals, co-occupations, relationships, and performance abilities. Ultimately it was a decision that challenged my occupational therapy identity (Laliberte-Rudman, 2002; Laliberte-Rudman & Dennhardt, 2008).

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Trauma and TraumaInformed (TI) Approaches to Care: Applications to Occupational Therapy Practice

Trauma and Trauma Informed (TI) Approaches to Care: Applications to Occupational Therapy Practice

Trauma is widespread and has profound effects that can lead to emotional and physical distress throughout the lifespan. Statistics from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on abuse and violence in the United States indicate the following:

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Musings on Oxytocin in Things We Do and Those We Care about Abstract

Musings on Oxytocin in Things We Do and Those We Care about

Abstract

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The Role of Occupational Therapy In Cancer Care

The Role of Occupational Therapy In Cancer Care

Cancer is a multifaceted disease that affects quality of life and occupation performance of millions of individuals across the nation. It is estimated, in the United States, 15.5 million individuals live with a history of cancer (Taylor, 2018; National Cancer Institute, 2018). The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2014), estimates that one in two men and one in three women before the age of 85 will be diagnosed with some form of cancer. Advances in medicine for cancer management and treatment for various forms of cancer, has significantly increased the survival rates of cancer patients. Occupational therapists (OTs), have the skills, knowledge, and education to provide interventions to cancers survivors to improve quality of life (QOL) and occupational performance.

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Wellness & Health Promotion is Center Stage

Wellness & Health Promotion is Center Stage

Wellness and health promotion efforts appear to be at center stage, as the society becomes more aware about the burden of chronic diseases over the lifespan. This knowledge fosters the understanding that lifestyle choices can have a significant impact on prevalence of chronic diseases (Snelling, 2014). The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) has identified Health and Wellness as a key practice area in the 21st century (AOTA, 2015). According to AOTA, “factors that will drive an increasing need for wellness-related services are based on an accumulating body of scientific evidence that an individual’s health is directly related to physical as well as emotional well-being” (AOTA, 2015) . To support practice, AOTA provides extensive resources for Health and Wellness practice embedded within occupational therapy, including evidence-based literature, technology applications to support domains of health, and professional development opportunities.

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The Executive Order and OT Implications: The Rising Suicide Rate in Baby Boomers and the Role of Occupational Therapy

The Executive Order and OT Implications: The Rising Suicide Rate in Baby Boomers and the Role of Occupational Therapy

Anjali K. Parti, OTD, OTR/L Gerontology Co-Chair Annette Bullard, COTA, Gerontology Co-Chair

At the Florida Occupational Therapy Association (FOTA) conference in 2018, Anjali Parti and Annette Bullard hosted a Conversations that Matter that was very well attended, many OT practitioners voiced an interest in doing more for mental health in the VA setting. We have decided to re-visit this important topic due to President Trump’s recent Executive Order signed March 5, 2019. Here is some information on the order and what the order entails:

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And The Award Goes To....

AND THE AWARD GOES TO….

 This #FOTA19 , as part of our yearly conference, we want to recognize all of our FOTA  members that have made remarkable contributions to our field of Occupational Therapy. There is just one thing ... we need your help to make this happen! We encourage you to nominate individuals that you feel have set the bar and exemplify the core values and ethics of Occupational Therapy. This is the opportunity to acknowledge, celebrate, and show our shared passion and appreciation with members of our community! Help us continue to celebrate and empassion our members by taking a moment to complete the nomination form. Awards will be released during the FOTA Annual Membership Meeting to be held during the FOTA annual conference.

Click to Nominate for an Award 



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Congratulations to our 36 New Leadership Program Participants, June 8th, 2019

Congratulations to our 36 New Leadership Program Participants, June 8th, 2019 

Leadership Development Program Event

 

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